Friday Night Lights Season 5

Friday Night Lights Season 5
The final season of cult fave Friday Night Lights begins much like the previous four: with football season fast approaching can the team ― now the East Dillon Lions ― make it to the State finals? Of course, the simplicity of the overarching story underscores the complex situations of the show's core characters. Julie Taylor is off to college, Tim Riggins is in jail and QB Vince Howard's father is finally out of it. Like its predecessor, season five continues to focus on coach Taylor and his wife, Tammy. He once again has to navigate the hurdles surrounding the East Dillon Lions in their quest to win a State championship while she adjusts to her new job as the school's guidance counsellor following her ouster as principal at Dillon High. Drama like this is part and parcel for any sports-driven high-school drama, but over the course of its five seasons, Friday Night Lights has managed to both embrace the stereotypes of its genre while simultaneously rising above them. The show is able to do so by letting the drama happen rather than forcing it upon its characters, a lesson learned through season two's much maligned murder plot. This being the show's final season, it's not surprising to find old characters returning for cameos, but the show's writers handle this task well, not overwhelming episodes with guest stars. Rather, they float in and out of life in Dillon, much like any high school grad would when returning to their hometown. Some episodes come with deleted scenes and audio commentaries, but the real gem is "The Lights Go Out" feature, which finds show runner Jason Katims reflecting on the series' rocky past, including season two's abbreviated run, due to the writers' strike, and the show's near-cancellation. It also breaks down the making of the show department by department, including the unique way the show shoots and edits, and there's even a glimpse into composer W.G. Snuffy Walden's process in creating the show's iconic score. Season five of Friday Night Lights does an excellent job of tying the series together without pandering to its audience. It could act as a how-to guide for ending a successful series. (Universal)