Entourage Season Three Part 2

Entourage Season Three Part 2

Hot rising star Vincent Chase (Adrian Grenier, getting by further on pretty eyes than just about any living actor) is surfing the crest of popularity coming off the James Cameron blockbuster Aquaman. His crew, consisting of Eric (his manager), Johnny (his brother/cook) and Turtle (his driver), are still happily reaping the fruits of their best friend’s fame in Hollywood. Vince’s ever-nervy agent Ari Gould (Jeremy Piven in his best role to date) pulls a bad moral move and jeopardises Vince’s trust, so in a cliff-hanging Season Three Part One finale, Vince fires Ari. Season Three Part Two opens with Vince and Eric hiring a new agent — the ballsy but beautiful Amanda (Carla Gugino), whose rapacious prowess appears to place things pleasantly in control. The thing is Vince wants his Pablo Escobar dream script, Medellin, and all Amanda can offer is an Edith Wharton period piece. Enter Ari, who’s driven to win Vince back. How? Benicio Del Toro just passed on the epic Escobar role, leaving the main role in Medellin open. Ari takes advantage of this and the rest, well, you’ll just have to watch. Mark Wahlberg’s faux autobiographical TV show has just wrapped up its fourth successful season. In case you’ve been living in a cave for the past four years, Entourage is a big deal. With near-flawless writing, superb performances and the indelible reference as being "the Sex in the City for men,” you could say the show is epochal for its time. So why is it that season three took this long to hit the shelves? It couldn’t have been because of the drably made bonus features (featuring commentary on the majority of episodes and a standard "behind the scenes” vignette); it doesn’t seem like much time was put into that. More importantly, why was it split into two parts? If the cynic in you is healthy, you’ll know the answer: to maximise revenue of course. It may take you an episode or two of Vince’s magic eyes to get over this, just don’t blame Wahlberg. Blame HBO. (Warner)