Elephant Tales Mario Andreacchio

Elephant Tales Mario Andreacchio
Sociologically, it would be interesting to study the subtle hypocrisies involved in the anthropomorphization of animals on celluloid, whether having elaborate conversations and learning valuable life lessons or demonstrating acumen in recreational sports, given the human propensity for celebrating life events and holidays while cooking and eating said animals. Indeed, there is almost as much amusement in the notion of a monkey playing hockey as there is in seeing a packaged ham with an animated picture of a smiling pig on it, which, in an oblique way, is kind of what Elephant Tales explores. The general idea of the film is that two elephant brothers, Zef and Tutu, suffer the loss of their mother at the hands of poachers and delude themselves into thinking that a rainbow took her away, which leads to a crappy sort of following of the proverbial yellow brick road. Along the way they discover Scottish cattle, a sassy monkey, a valley-girl giraffe and a lion cub that all share the commonality of dead parents. The film is done entirely with real animals, which explains why a lot of the footage doesn't fit together very well and why the writing often stretches in peculiar directions in order to accommodate the minor idiosyncrasies of the animal movements on screen. Also, for the cynical observer, it's quite difficult to overlook the fact that while Zef is mourning the loss of his mother and talking of rainbows, he is sporting a raging boner and that a later scene of group despondency occurs when the elephants are rolling around in faeces and sniffing each other's hind quarters. In addition to these oddities, there is a scene where the elephants storm a camp of poachers, discover elephant tusks and remark, "this smells just like mom." Good lord! No special features are available with the DVD release, leaving the glory of the film itself to be the main attraction. (MGM)