Easy A [Blu-Ray] Will Gluck

Easy A [Blu-Ray] Will Gluck
Shoving aside tween comedies and Harry Potter sequels, Easy A wants a seat at the Mean Girls table ― not literally, but in the sense of being a smart, snappy, female-fronted teen comedy that doesn't trade in pie fucking, nerd makeovers or virgin quests. Olive (breakout star Emma Stone) is a social outcast in her high school who wrongly gets a slutty reputation when a false rumour spreads. Taking inspiration from current literature assignment The Scarlett Letter, Olive embraces her newfound bad girl reputation, stitches a handmade "A" on her clothes and lets her freak flag fly. Her new rep puts her on the social radar in a completely different way, but Olive ― being a strong, confident, smart woman who knows herself and is amused by the multiplying falsehoods ― embraces the absurdity of the student body's reaction. But when other outcasts see the impact this rumour is having on Olive's social status, they begin negotiating deals with her ― let them see a little shine from some fictional Olive "action" and they'll experience a similar rise in visibility. For gay friend Brandon (Dan Byrd), a little het rep will help ease him through the last couple of tough years before he can escape and be himself, while righteous Christian teen Marianne (Amanda Bynes) wages an all-out war against Olive's immoral "activities"; naturally, there's a cute boy (Gossip Girl's Penn Badgley) who doesn't care what others say and wants to woo his way into Olive's heart, not her pants. Easy A is smart and clever, full of snappy dialogue and sarcastic parents (a winning combination of Patricia Clarkson and Stanley Tucci), exactly the sort of teen movie people hope for when offered nothing but retreads of dreck. However, it's also the kind of movie that ― having earned a reputation as smart, clever and full of snappy dialogue ― people deem precious or pretentious when they finally get around to viewing: the Juno effect. And, sure, like Juno there's an inordinate amount of young people offering up witty rejoinders and snappy comebacks beyond their years. No one is ever that articulate and the build-up of banter is occasionally overwhelming. But if that's Easy A's biggest sin ― being too smart and aware ― it's a minor one, given the crimes against youth culture commonly witnessed at the multiplex. Home viewing offerings include a better-than-average making-of (including screenwriter Bert V. Royal's revelations that he wrote Easy A in four days, and that it's the first in an intended series of literary classics set in contemporary high school), some deleted scenes and a commentary with young director Gluck and star Stone. The two have incredible chemistry that will hopefully result in a long, fruitful working relationship. (Sony)