Disclosure [Blu-Ray] Barry Levinson

Disclosure [Blu-Ray] Barry Levinson
In tackling what is ostensibly an extensive narrative MacGuffin, wherein computer specialist Tom Sanders (Michael Douglas) charges his new boss, Meredith Johnson (Demi Moore) – a woman with whom he's had past sexual encounters and who has recently taken a VP role he felt would be his – with sexual harassment, Disclosure makes a few key observations about gender imbalances in a corporate environment. Most of the film operates under the assumption that Meredith makes an aggressive pass at Tom, shortly after her promotion, because she's drunk with power and keen on objectifying something desirable. It's a practical assumption based on merely reversing the standard gender roles without providing any context for the inherent differences between men and women. She has inserted herself into a traditionally male role and therefore would have the same desires and motivators as dictated by her assimilative performance, right? This is even reinforced by a statement made by Meredith late in the movie that both acknowledges and distorts the nature of sexuality in relation to corporate power: "You want to put me on trial here? Let's be honest about what it's for. I am a sexually aggressive woman. I like it. Tom knew it and you can't handle it. It's the same damn thing since the beginning of time. Veil it, hide it, lock it up and throw away the key. We expect a woman to do a man's job, make a man's money and then walk around with a parasol and lie down for a man to fuck her like it was a hundred years ago." But this justification is impractical, seeing as adapting and performing a male role for survival doesn't entail psychological transformation, acknowledging that the nature of power in a female environment would not revolve around power as a sexually subjugating force. This is why Disclosure is so much more intelligent than its superficial controversial trend topic veneer appears. Political correctness dictates audience investment in this central plot, since they're afraid to acknowledge their doubt of Moore's motivations in seducing the older, pudgier Douglas. It makes the twist that much more intriguing by revealing the true nature of corporate manipulation in a male enterprise, wherein self-preservation promotes sociopathic behaviour and a natural affinity for backstabbing. Sexuality merely becomes something for a woman to exploit a man with, blinding him to her true motivations while amusingly catering to his solipsism. And even though the film is now dated, having a hilariously cheesy climax involving a virtual reality tour and a lot of awkward tech speak, the occasionally unflattering gender observations remain true. And since this is an older film transferred to Blu-Ray, there are no supplements to expand upon these concepts and thoughts. (Warner)