Diminished Capacity Terry Kinney

Diminished Capacity Terry Kinney
Both watchable and forgettable, corny and sincere, laboured and natural, Diminished Capacity makes little impression, offering a requisite message of memory over money, along with some forced zaniness and familiar oddball secondary characters. There is a distinctly Sunday afternoon, Sundance feeling to the film, which will please some, annoy others and make little difference to most, who will likely find themselves performing household chores while viewing. After suffering a head injury that impacts his short-term memory, Cooper (Matthew Broderick) travels home to rural Missouri from his big city editing job to visit his senile uncle (Alan Alda), who is about to lose his home. While there, the two bond over forgetfulness and make a journey to a baseball card and memorabilia convention, with the accompaniment of Cooper’s high school sweetheart Charlotte (Virginia Madsen). Comedy, drama and more importantly, life lessons permeate this little road trip where some find personal betterment and others let go of things that are standing in their way. It’s all very felicitous, if occasionally contrived. Name actors deliver equally moderate performances, with Broderick seeming bored for most of the film, Madsen making a boring character at least likable and Alda clearly striving for prestigious recognition and a potential supporting actor Oscar nod with his depiction of the senile uncle who thinks fish are typing on his typewriter. With less inappropriate gunplay, and consciously peculiar and cartoon-ish secondary characters, this little memory parable may have connected to a greater degree. However, as it stands, Diminished Capacity will be forgotten just as quickly as the many day-to-day rituals and factoids that Cooper has to keep written on a personal notepad. The DVD release includes no features aside from English subtitles for the hearing impaired. (Seville)