Death Race 3: Inferno [Blu-Ray] Roel Reiné

Death Race 3: Inferno [Blu-Ray] Roel Reiné
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As the third entry in the franchise — chronologically wedged between the 2008 remake of schlock producer Roger Corman's Death Race 2000 from 1975 and the 2010 prequel — Death Race 3: Inferno delivers on the promise of cheap thrills, frequent explosions and huge vehicles racing across magnificent the South African landscape. An introduction brings us up to speed: in the not-too-distant future, corporations own prisons and televise violent car races between inmates. In the previous film, Carl Lucas (Luke Goss) was burned in the climactic race, hideously deforming his face and, with the help of a mask, transforming him into the popular Frankenstein. As this new film begins, Frankenstein has won four races, leaving him only one win away from being released from prison, as per the rules of the show. However, a hostile takeover of Weyland International (with Ving Rhames as the titular CEO) leaves megalomaniac Niles York (Dougray Scott) in charge and, not surprisingly, the rules are changed. York enlists Carl to race in the first-ever outdoor event being held in South Africa, with the stipulation that he must lose or he will be killed. With the help of his old crew, including scantily clad girlfriend Katrina (Tanit Phoenix) and the brawny Goldberg (Danny Trejo), Carl attempts to gain their freedom. Throughout the three days of the race, not to mention a vicious fight pitting female inmates against each other to be co-pilots before the competition even begins, there's hardly any time to deal with elements of plot, so it's inevitable that dialogue and character development aren't going to be subtle. However, the series' audience is sure to be pleased by the emphasis on pyrotechnics and flesh, even though it's more ironic than ever that many of the seamier elements being embraced by these fans are the same being satirized in the films' bleak vision of the future. The prevalent message from the generous bonus material is just how fun this movie was to make. Aside from not only including both deleted scenes and shots, there are separate featurettes detailing the production, driving stunts and the inspirational story of former convict Danny Trejo's unlikely rise in show business. A commentary track by Dutch director Roel Reine entertainingly affirms how pleasant an experience it was on-set, sounding downright giddy in discussing everything from how fun blowing things up can be to the finer points of working with digital cameras. (Universal)