Dead Space: Aftermath Mike Disa

Dead Space: Aftermath Mike Disa
After the events of Dead Space: Downfall left Earth cut off from Isaac Clarke and the USG Ishimura, the USG O'Bannon (presumably named after the writer of Alien) was dispatched to investigate, only to suffer a similar fate. The events of Dead Space: Aftermath surround the four survivors of the O'Bannon, flashing back and forth between their original mission assignment and the government debriefing post-rescue. To distinguish between past and present, traditional anime animation represents the past Aegis VII carnage, while some dreadful, lifeless CG kills any potential dramatic impact of the present interviews and fear tactics. It's a distracting technique that hinders an already mediocre storyline that liberally borrows from influences like Alien and Event Horizon. The premise of Dead Space, wherein an Earth picked bare of resources sends out ships to "planet-crack" alien planets for sustenance, hints at broader sci-fi complexities and a potentially unique mythology, given the mysteries that could be unearthed and the complications that could stem from combining separate ecosystems, and so on. The straight-to-DVD movie associated with the upcoming Dead Space 2 videogame is concerned less = with broadening the mythology or looking at new fictional scientific possibilities than with rehashing storylines from existing films while characters wander around and repeatedly say, "fuck" for no discernable reason. Since the majority of the dramatic ire comes from Red Marker fragments driving the crew to erratic and violent behaviour (not to mention reanimating the dead), there's a lot of random screaming, chasing of ghosts and mistaking loved ones for grotesque monsters, which, again, all feels extremely familiar. Perhaps if some attention had been paid to making the dialogue somewhat more mature and consistent, or if they had at least attempted one or two original plot threads, this could have been an entertaining videogame tie-in. As is, it's little more than a quick cash-grab associated with a far superior gaming product. No supplements are included with the DVD, save a trailer for the game, which looks quite impressive. (Anchor Bay)