Transfer Damir Lukacevic

Transfer Damir Lukacevic
A solid premise is marred by mediocre filmmaking and a script that seldom has much to say beyond touching upon the obvious surface of complex questions of morality and mortality it raises. In the future society presented in Transfer, science has discovered a way to cheat death by transferring the consciousness of one human into another. Of course, this means that affluent white people near their deathbeds start buying an extended ride in the bodies of virile, young Africans desperate for money to support their families. It's not a suicide mission for the hosts; their minds regain control while their new meat suit bosses slumber. How this form of sleep deprivation affects the body or either of the minds is conveniently ignored, but the practicality of science is not part of this film's purview. Testing the bonds of new and old love and how we face death are Transfer's primary concerns. Anna and Hermann are an elderly German couple intent on dying together. When Anna falls terminally ill, she agrees to have her mind cohabit the body of a young African woman named Sarah, Hermann taking her counterpart, Apolain. The new couple are carefully selected for body chemistry compatibility so that the physical qualities of Anna and Hermann's love will not suffer. This also means there's a pretty damn good chance that Sarah and Apolain will be inclined to get pelvic, especially since they are essentially prisoners, forbidden from leaving the estate while their minds are in charge during the night. They are monitored by an awkward man from the transfer company for three months, after which time, Anna and Hermann must decide whether to stay in their rented bodies and have their old husks cremated, or return to their sinking flesh ships and face death. A crush the surveillance man has on Sarah is never really examined, its existence little more than convenient positioning for later plot points. It seems to be aiming for the quiet, thoughtful, character-driven science fiction of a film like Gattaca, but Transfer never coheres into more than an interesting collection of ideas. As stark and barebones as most of the aseptic environments it depicts, there are no extras in this DVD package. (Mongrel Media)