Cop Out [Blu-Ray] Kevin Smith

Cop Out [Blu-Ray] Kevin Smith
It may not be a full-fledged Kevin Smith film, but the Blu-Ray edition of Cop Out receives the full Smith treatment when it comes to features. Let's get the mediocrity out of the way up front. The movie itself is competent, but sits squarely in the middle of the road. A long-time NYPD detective duo on the Brooklyn beat get suspended without pay after an attempt to bust a drug dealer goes awry in a hail of bullets. Jimmy (Bruce Willis) was relying on his wage to scrape together enough cash to pay for his daughter's wedding, in a display of manhood against his ex-wife's rich new husband (Jason Lee, in a straight asshole bit part). Selling a rare baseball card is Jimmy's ticket to the funds he needs, but the Shit Bandit (a scene-stealing Sean William Scott, as juvenile as the role is) squashes that plan, thieves the card, selling it for drugs. There's a sub-plot about Jimmy's partner Paul (Tracy Morgan) obsessing over thoughts of his wife cheating on him, but that, and the plot itself, are essentially irrelevant. The likelihood you'll enjoy Cop Out enough to justify the time spent watching it depends on your love of Tracy Morgan being his wacky self ― not the 30 Rock Tracy Jordan level insanity, but a more grounded, naïve absurdity ― and your ability to play "spot the homage" to '80s cop flicks and the Warner catalogue. Now for the good: "Maximum Comedy Mode." Even though Smith took the film in essentially a work-for-hire capacity, he gives the features his all, playing with, and poking fun at, the format in ways yet untouched, much like his approach to DVD features on his earlier films. He effectively utilizes all the previously established extras ― deleted scenes, alternate takes, outtakes, gag reel material, storyboard, walk-on commentary, focus points, cast and crew interviews ― while injecting fresh goofiness, like commenting on his own commentary and Shit Bandit pop-ups. As expected with a cast and director this capable of bringing the funny, many of the best laughs were left on the cutting room floor (Rashida Jones and Tracy Morgan's exchanges) or didn't have a place in the film (Michelle Trachenberg's filthy wit). But, hey, Smith did his job for the studio and made money in theatres, and did right by his fan base on the Blu-Ray release. Fatman's a team player. Appreciate or deride at your own discretion. (Warner)