Control Alt Delete Cameron Labine

Control Alt Delete Cameron Labine
Usually, when the MPAA rating pops up before a movie, the rationales noted are those of violence, coarse language or nudity. But with Control Alt Delete, the "Restricted" rating comes care of "aberrant behaviour." I'm going to go out on a limb and assume that said behaviour is that of Lewis (Tyler Labine), a repressed and exceedingly insecure computer-coding expert fucking his computer. I mean, it isn't just alluded to with playful comic facial expressions, a pervy song from Peaches and a cutaway to a doughnut and a hotdog. No, we see him rub the "hole" of the computer, caress it and slam away for an extended time while the sound of a Windows prompt for new hardware found acknowledges this union. You have to hand it to Tyler Labine, who spends most of the movie naked, either masturbating, screwing computers or being humiliated by women, for going all out and convincingly selling the heat of the moment. Of course, there's more going on here than that of sexual "aberrance," with the story mainly detailing Lewis's struggle with self, unable to perform sexually for his girlfriend, Sarah (Laura Bertram), finding comfort in the lack of judgment and expectations of his PC. Even at work, where he updates computer networks for the impending Y2K crisis, he demonstrates an inferiority complex, passively performing normalcy for fear of having his perversions exposed. What we learn is that everyone has some sort of characteristic adverse to the status quo, whether it be peeping at co-workers at the urinals or hooking up webcams in their toilet. It's just a shame that these deviances never move beyond the scatological or the bedroom to make this movie more than an occasionally awkward, passing curiosity. Even the comedy is inconsistent, with cast members like Sonja Bennett demonstrating subtlety and excellent timing, while others, such as Alisen Down, as an anxious corporate robot, go way over the top, having the subtlety of a sledgehammer. Along with a commentary track, the DVD features interviews with all of the cast and key members of the creative team, which elaborate on themes and project appeal. Unfortunately, it's all a little hard to make out due to the incompetently recorded sound. (E1)