Cherish Finn Taylor

Cherish Finn Taylor
The majority of Cherish deals with socially awkward Zoe Adler's (Robin Tunney) attempt to break free, both literally and figuratively. Mostly, though, audiences get a clear picture of how clever writer/director Finn Taylor thinks he is. No doubt Taylor has seen High Fidelity, and has to emulate the hip cult appeal, but unfortunately his interpretations of music too often seem forced. What remains is a film that is too aware of its own quirkiness.

Adler is a patsy graphic artist who is so awkward and passive-aggressive we can scarcely blame her boss Brynn (Liz Phair) for being such a bitch to her. Though most comfortable interacting with the DJ of her favourite radio station, Zoe decides to crash an office get-together that leaves her drunk and the victim of a botched car jacking. She comes to, drunk at the wheel of a car that has killed a bike cop. Saved from jail time, Zoe is placed under house arrest. The majority of the time, we watch Adler deal with too much time on her hands. She roller-skates, straightens her frizzy hair, talks in front of the mirror while trying on new outfits and sees how far she can push the patience of parole officer Daly (Tim Blake Nelson).

Cherish isn't without its moments — it's a pretty slick affair — but the sweetness that added to its charm in the beginning turns sour as Finn attempts to turn Cherish into a whodunit thriller. It's no secret that Adler has been wrongly accused, but we almost forget, as she seemingly does, until too late in the movie.