Cadavres Erik Canuel

Cadavres Erik Canuel
If nothing else, Cadavres will likely be the only Canadian film released in 2009 to feature graphic incest, "poop swimming" and a man spinning around on his erection like a human top while a half-naked hooker in clown makeup cheers. It's like what might happen if Jane Campion, Gregg Araki and Barry Levinson got together, dropped some acid, watched The Cement Garden and Spun and then decided to make a French-Canadian tragicomedy. The thing revels in its seediness from the get go, with a mother and son (Sylvie Boucher and Patrick Huard) discussing the stupidity of life while drunk driving and tossing around a loaded gun, eventually settling on faux-fellatio-turned-matricide. He then kicks her out of the car into a muddy ditch and calls up his long-lost sister (Julie Le Breton), who's understandably alarmed to discover what has become of their mother. Before wandering around frontally nude for her big bro, she convinces him to go back to the ditch and pick up mom's corpse, where they unexpectedly find the dead body of a gang member. It all devolves from there, milking the term "black comedy" for all it's worth, stretching the limits of taste and audience tolerance with genitalia-littered set designs and an entire sequence involving faeces. The weird thing about all this audacity is that it's actually kind of fun, given that it's played for laughs, never reaching for anything beyond the amusement of misanthropic woe. Sure, it'll test the stomachs of most viewers, with scenes of a fully erect brother serving his sister mouldy Kraft Dinner while discussing his trademark move — the aforementioned "spinner" — but those that get the joke will most likely discover a new cult favourite. The DVD includes French-only commentary and bloopers, along with a brief special effects supplement and trailer. (Seville)