Brooklyn's Finest [Blu-Ray] Brooklyn's Finest [Blu-Ray]

Brooklyn's Finest [Blu-Ray] Brooklyn's Finest [Blu-Ray]
It's good to know that somewhere out there, Antoine Fuqua is utterly mystified by the fact that one person's right is another's wrong. Much like other recent garbage police fare, such as Street Kings, Pride & Glory and American Gangster (all movies from which Brooklyn's Finest literally steals shots and ideas), the message here is that "morality is fluid, motherfucker." And, yes, everyone in this movie is a motherfucker, and they make sure to remind each other of it every 15 seconds, when not yelling, screwing a hooker or looking melodramatically defeated by a corrupt world. From a plotting perspective, first-time screenwriter Michael C. Martin missed the day in class where everyone learned about ridiculous, eye-rolling clichés. Eddie (Richard Gere) is an alcoholic cop with only seven days left on the job; Tango (Don Cheadle) is an undercover cop who's been under for too long; and Sal (Ethan Hawke) exploits the criminals he arrests to make a better life for his children and sick wife. Cheadle's criminal underworld is mirrored by a similarly shady police force, while Hawke shoots unarmed gangsters and steals their money, and Gere screws a black prostitute, chasing down black pimps with white hookers, in a woefully unbalanced and flawed ode to hypocrisy and racism. Because the film takes itself so seriously, it's hard not to laugh every time a character pauses and sighs, occasionally looking up to the sky, while dipping further into shades of grey morality, especially when the theme of white on black injustice is so laboured and preachy. Furthermore, while they shot on location in Brooklyn to add authenticity, the film is ugly and sluggishly directed, aside from a random jump-cut sex scene, wherein a woman's tits are framed for a good 30 seconds, which we'll assume has something to do with maternal longing rather than "whoa, tits!" Later, we watch her wipe her crotch with a big wad of toilet paper in between tricks for a good minute, which, again, I'm guessing adds to how considerate her character is supposed to be. The Blu-Ray comes with an embarrassing commentary track, featuring director Antoine Fuqua, along with multiple mini-supplements about the actors, police training, the writer and the director, which are essentially just chopped up versions of a bigger "Making of." What's worth watching, however, is the "Boyz 'n the Real Hood" supplement, where some Brooklyn locals express their thoughts on location shooting with some festive interjections and something about "keepin' it real." And, indeed, they do keep it real, motherfucker. (VVS)