The Boss of It All Lars von Trier

The Boss of It All Lars von Trier
Danish terror Lars von Trier once again turns his attention to superficial formal innovation, this time with a computer program that determines the camera angles and movements in lieu of the director. It’s unclear as to what this method is supposed to prove, but the occasionally awkward hiccups from setup to setup don’t distract from the clever comedy that’s the main event. The plot deals with a cowardly businessman named Ravn (Peter Ganzler), who’s been blaming all of his unpopular decisions on a superior magnate who doesn’t exist. When a deal to sell his IT company requires the actual presence of this "boss of it all,” he hires his vain actor friend Svend (Jens Albius) to play the part. Unfortunately, Svend introduces himself to the staff, meaning Ravn has to let him hang around the office, and everything goes fine until Svend discovers the true extent of his buddy’s dishonesty. This initially grates with von Trier’s trademark misogyny but the thing gathers steam as it reveals why the staff are all so completely neurotic and provides a genuine moral dilemma for a character that tries his best to avoid such matters. The pieces all fall into place with remarkable precision and the mood of barely suppressed anguish proves surprisingly hilarious. Even non-fans of the director will get something out of this well-written farce, which despite the Brechtian narration at the beginning, middle and end, is mostly just a funny movie anyone can enjoy. The only extra is an interview with the director by one Eva Ziemsen, which isn’t especially illuminating. The questioner wastes time on a pre-amble featuring her sophomoric Dogme 95 knockoff (i.e., performing the interview naked), which she then tries to impose on von Trier to no visible gain. (Seville)