Bones: Season Two

Bones: Season Two

For its second season, Fox’s premiere crime series Bones does very little different. And that’s okay because while the forensic scientists get a little too egg-headed and the skeletons in the evidence closet provide some eye-rolling cases, the show has a cast with enough chemistry to make a Blair Witch Project re-enactment worth watching, which of course, they do in episode ten. Once again, all eyes are on the hot "not-a-couple” duo of Special Agent Seely Booth (David Boreanz) and Dr. Temperance "Bones” Brennan (Emily Deschanel), who often resemble Mulder and Scully, only sillier. While they stole the show in the inaugural season, Booth and Bones are almost upstaged by their supporting cast this time around, which includes recurring cameos by Ryan O’Neal and Stephen Fry. Unfortunately the show doesn’t introduce much of an arc, other than Bones’s continued search for the truth about her parents. (Yawn.) Truths are revealed, largely through O’Neal’s enjoyable appearances as her father, but it’s hardly anything that keeps you returning week after week. Instead it’s the cases, where fleshless bodies turn up in gators, victims are discovered in the same sequence as in Bones’s novel and a reversed situation where there’s no skeleton at all — a repugnant case where the geek squad of Zach (Eric Millegan) and Hodgins (T.J. Thyne) inflate a head like a balloon to find its identity. New characters like Dr. Camille Saroyan (Tamara Taylor), replacing first season’s Goodman, and Sully (Eddie McClintock), provide the two leads with romantic storylines but they only work as temporary distractions — no doubt some filler until Bones and Booth realise they’re in love. The finale doesn’t do much to leave the viewer hanging — an inter-office wedding? — which reinforces just how much this show needs a dramatic thread to give it vitality. However, it’s pretty funny seeing ZZ Top’s Billy Gibbons make a cameo as lab hottie Angela’s father though. The look back on the season shares the typical giggly nostalgia, which is nothing but a tacked on 16-minute bonus to make the sixth disc meatier. The visual effects get their due in a featurette, as deserved, considering the amount of technology and the "revolting human remains” the show uses. As expected, the deleted scenes add little and the gag reel is one big inside joke. Plus: two commentaries. (Fox)