Blood Night: The Legend of Mary Hatchet [Blu-Ray] Frank Sabatella

Blood Night: The Legend of Mary Hatchet [Blu-Ray] Frank Sabatella
If Scream 4 taught us anything, it's that horror audiences have gotten less intelligent as the years have gone by. Viewers who didn't understand that the fourth Scream was in fact mocking its younger audience rather than its now clichéd, self-referential plot may also feel inclined to buy a film like writer/director's Frank Sabatella's soon to be forgotten Blood Night: The Legend of Mary Hatchet. This slasher's plot is as predictable as a drunken girl plagued with daddy issues at a kegger. A group of horny teenagers commemorate the anniversary of a Long Island urban legend where a now deceased teenage girl named Mary Hatchet (Samantha Facci) killed her family by throwing a Blood Night party. One by one the hollow, one-note characters begin to disappear and with the help of Graveyard Gus (Bill Moseley), the no-name actors who aren't just cashing a paycheque find out who really is behind their friends' murders. In Blood Night, Mary Hatchet is a blood-thirsty killer who only kills when she's on her period, proving to feminists everywhere that female antagonists in horror films really are just reflections of men's constant fear of menstruation. The film's low-budget and shaky editing makes this horror film barely enjoyable and even though the blood does flow, all the gore effects look like they were literally squeezed from a dirty pad. (The Blu-Ray disc only enhances these flaws.) Although many horror website reviewers would disagree, it's arguable that many are too afraid to voice their opinions in fear of offending their B-list horror actor Facebook friends appearing in this film. Like a no-name tampon, viewers will find it hard to withstand 77 minutes of heavy menstrual blood flow that leaves an embarrassing mess afterwards. The Blu-Ray features include a somewhat inappropriately funny blooper reel, the trailer and an honest and informative behind-the-scenes featurette and audio commentary track from director Sabatella, who is humble enough to admit the film's many shortcomings. (Anchor Bay)