Bellflower [Blu-Ray] Evan Glodell

Bellflower [Blu-Ray] Evan Glodell
According to the Blu-Ray jacket for Bellflower, Evan Glodell's exercise in Jersey Shore stylization, it is an "angst-ridden critique of, and from, Generation Y." Now, I've heard a bunch of babbling about Generation X and Y and whatever other labels people want to give the end result of political generational folly, but I'm not sure that white trash is specific to the modern age. In fact, the unwashed, uneducated youths depicted in Bellflower look pretty standard issue for any small town with limited industry, wherein lifelong trajectories stem directly from high school and vocabularies rarely develop beyond "dude" and "fuck." Here, best buddies Woodrow (Glodell) and Aiden (Tyler Dawson) spend their time building a Mad Max apocalypse car and flamethrowers, having nothing else to look forward to but the optimistically anticipated end of civil society. And, like any dangerously homoerotic male kinship, things are thrown into a tizzy when a spunky young lass named Milly (Jessie Wiseman) enters the picture, beating Woodrow at a cricket-eating competition and winning his heart in the process. Of course, since this is the story of insular male angst, wherein everything crashes down when they realize the entire world doesn't revolve specifically around them, femininity is portrayed as a calculating, vengeful mode of manipulation and unwanted compromise. In fact, the hyperbolic representation of heartache and devastation, or emotional maturity, for those a little less narcissistic, is really just an endless series of phalluses, in the form of guns, gigantic flamethrowers and fire-breathing cars. There is some emotional truth to it all, since the eventual anarchic turn of romantic turmoil is depicted quite sharply in the final acts of violence, but it's only with the aid of excess stylization. The entire film is saturated with light, giving a yellow, glistening hue to most sequences, which works in conjunction with the crass MTV editing and over-reliance on sound mixing. Essentially, the occasional dirty camera lens and glossy aesthetic, mixed with an off-kilter soundtrack, makes this standard issue male B.S. somewhat arty and interesting to watch. Included with the Blu-Ray are a handful of interviews and supplements on the exceedingly independent nature of the production, along with some info about the Medusa Mad Max car. (Oscilloscope)