Amerika Idol: A True Story Barry Avrich

Amerika Idol: A True Story Barry Avrich
Early on in Amerika Idol, a documentary about a small Serbian town that decides to build a sculpture of Rocky Balboa for "inspiration" and tourism dollars, a resident states that Rocky acts as a role model for local youth, as he chooses sports over violent crime — a sport that involves punching people in the head repeatedly until they are unconscious. This, along with some garble about Rocky being a universal representation of the underdog, seems to be the logic behind Serbians building a giant symbol of American vulgarity.

The documentary also covers the drama in Philadelphia over whether or not the prop sculpture used in the Rocky films was considered art and worthy of being displayed at the art museum. When one considers that art is typically considered an analysis of cultural foibles in an effort to aid social progress, then of course a sculpture of a monosyllabic Italian boxer is art, and so is the toilet at Denny's.

The argument in the doc is that many Americans are "moved" by the sculpture — when not running up and down the museum stairs, just as Rocky did — because people are rarely capable of anything outside of mimicry. A counter argument might be that many people also watch Survivor, a show about fat rich Americans who make a game out of Third World living when not calling each other "bitches" and conspiring against one another.

Speaking of art, Amerika Idol barely constitutes such, given that its assembly is half-assed at best and the only message seems to be that ignorance is universal. On the upside, the Rocky Balboa statue in Zitiste, Serbia had its big reveal during their annual chicken festival, since their logo — the cock — represents a strong and powerful winner. Indeed. (Melbar)