The Adventures of Aquaman: The Complete Collection

The Adventures of Aquaman: The Complete Collection
Aquaman has been the brunt of many jokes recently thanks to a humiliating failed series on the CW, an unflattering appearance on Robot Chicken and ironic movie success in Entourage. Google "Aquaman is lame” and a number of different results come up in favour and against the claim but seriously, why no love for this classic superhero? Someone’s got to protect the sea from the rather sexy Vassa and her beardy Mermen, or the dastardly recurring Fisherman. Superman, Batman and Green Lantern all have their own foes and can’t possibly cover land, air and sea. Cut Aquaman some slack. Airing back in 1967, The Adventures of Aquaman resembles the Spider-Man series from the same year: plenty of recycled motions and poses, images and dialogue, though all in a deliciously primitive and nostalgic package. For a complete series, The Adventures of Aquaman offers a paltry 36 episodes, each of which runs for seven minutes, but that’s all he needs to vanquish his enemies; it is in fact so easy for him that sometimes you don’t even notice until the credits roll. On top of that, he gives important lessons, like when conquering the Brain he quips: "You can have a brain and still not be very smart.” With trusty sidekick Aqualad (a blatant "Holy tadpoles!” Robin knock-off — sorry Aqualad, but it’s true), Aquaman gets shit done in the seven seas, count ’em, seven. His weakness is exposed when he’s captured by the Reptile-Men and tied up out of water, where we learn if he spends a full hour away from water he will die. Okay, that is a lame Achilles heel, and maybe so are the easy solutions he finds to stop his enemies. The Reptile-Men? Just drop some boulders on top of the hole to their fortress. The Stickmen of Stygia? Um, get some dolphins this time to drop some boulders on their ship. But why not have a superhero who runs with campy storylines and laughably defeatable villains? Plus, he really wears that orange and green combination well, don’t you think? "The Sovereign of the Seas” is a lone featurette that gets experts and DC employees to defend Aquaman’s position as a superhero; they vouch for his strength and duties policing the underwater realm. They drop big praise like "King Arthur of the water” and "epic storytelling” filled with all sorts of mythological references. Most importantly though, they point out the unique perspective Aquaman has over other heroes: who else fights crime under water? Exactly. (Warner)